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20130131
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Search Results 60 to 76 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)
are refusing to give up hope 24 years after she vanished. i'm carolyn johnson. >> and i'm dan ashley. the case remains an active investigation after all of these years. he was last seen on this date in 1989 on her way to an ice skating lesson in dublin. s and he is live withh her with the latest on the case. john? >> reporter: dan, eileen was last seen here on san ramon road. her family and her supporters walked by here in an annual ritual to keep this case alive. for the 24th year they made this walk through dublin and leading more than a hundred supporters. >> the turnout is amazing. i always worry there won't be anybody here and we have had a marvelous and an amazing turnout. >> i just hope this all leads to some information that might come out about eileen. >> reporter: eileen was 13 when she vanished while walking home from wells middle school on her way home from ice skating practice. that was january 30th, 1989. a missing children website has photos of what she might look like as an adult. tonight the procession went along the route she was thought to have followed when she vanished. in
johnson. larry, carolyn? back to you. >> thank you. >> work crews pulled an overnighter on the bay bridge to mark a key milestone in creating the world's biggest light sculpture, workers startedding stringing 25,000 white led lights. the artist behind the project told us it will stretch two miles wide, 500 feet tall and will twinkle in pattern twoz years. going to be fun to seevÑe=u. >> it will be. i don't know how it's going to be when you're driving on the bridge. >> they say you're not going to notice it that is what they say. >> yes. yes. >> it's gooding to be cold and wet tomorrow. >> you don't lts nths the rain. >> yes. yes. whatever. >> we do have rain coming our way. here is a live view from our east bay hills camera. looking at the western sky. what a beautiful sky it s sunny skies now. clouds around, colorful. you can imagine how colorful sunset is going to be this afternoon. taking a look at live doppler 7 hd showing how cloud free our skies be at the moment. but those clouds will increase overnight as rain approaches so rain arriving tomorrow, there is a chance of showers sun
on everything from your vision to quality of life. here's carolyn johnson with the details. >> on a bad day, even driving can be a challenge for helen cole. >> the hardest part about driving is seeing the signs clearly and it adds a distinctive glare of buriness. >> while her normal vision is fine, the blurriness comes from a condition called dry eye. she's forced to treat it throughout the day. >> from the time you get up in the morning your eyes already feel gritty, sometimes they are swollen. definitely red and they have a burning sensation. >> you have a relatively low oil here. >> the opt tommologist said the condition is often caused by a lack of oil which allows the eye's natural shape pour to evaporate. he is going to treat it with a new technology called bipiflow. first they perform a laser scan of her eyes to measure the amount and quality of the oil, as well as her natural pattern of blinking. >> that represents the blinks. >> after analyzing the data, the doctor places two small cups directly on to helen's eyes. they are designed to reach the oil glands beneath her eyelids. >> i
. abc7 news health and science reporter carolyn johnson has the details. >> for jessica, mike -- microbes are a win dough into the human body. >> everything in your gut, you are eating what you eat. >> she's talking about the thousands of biological hitchhikers that live in our bodies. earlier this year researchers at the glad stone institute at ucf did a detailed map that helped and catalog all the bacteria present in the human digestive system. they believe knowing which organisms are there and what they are doing can tell us a lot about what is going on inside our bodies. >> there's a wide range of diseases, everything from obesity to diabetes. >> to take advantage of that information, richmond and her team are launching a start-up called u-bium. it's like 23 and m it's head quartered at an incubator lab at ucf. doug crawford believes the project could pay multiple dividends. >> they are turning science into a business with success. she said once the dna is sequence, the company hopes to provide valuable clues about an individual's health style. >> it looks like you are eat
. and hates worked for him. >> thank you. >> thanks for joining us for abc 7 news at 4:00. i'm carolyn johnson. >> abc 7 news at 5:00 begins right now. >> thank you. breaking news in a plant has workers make discovery of a body in the trashánb- >> another night of freezing cold conditions and warnings you need about going into the weekend. >> the way people are being targeted for phones in one city this, is a story you'll see only on abc 7 news. >> a seek ree cycling center turns up a grisly discovery, a body found among all of the trash. >> this story just now unfolding this afternoon. >> the sheriff's department says a bod yes was found this afternoon at novato disposeal services business on petaluma boulevard off highway 101. sergio, what have you learned?. >> there is not a lot of information coming from the ík know is that body wad here at the site that is a q in petaluma. that body found about 1:45 this afternoon. let's show you video we have sky 7. a different perspective on the ground here.aó3ú a quick conversation with workers on scene tell me the body found inside of a large bui
to your quality of life. here is abc7 news health and science reporter carolyn johnson with the details. >> on a bad day, even driving can be a challenge for helen cole. >> the hardest part about driving is seeing the signs clearly and it adds a distinctive glare of blurriness. >> while her normal vision is fine, the blurriness comes from a condition called dry eye. in helen's case it is so severe she's forced to treat it with drops and compresses throughout the day. >> from the time you get up in the morning your eyes already feel gritty, sometimes they are swollen. definitely red and they have a burning sensation. >> you have a relatively low oil layer. >> the ophtamologist said the condition is often caused by a lack of oil which allows the eye's natural oil to evaporate. he is going to treat it with a new technology called lipiflow. it's from pure science. -- tier science. >> that's perfect. >> first they perform a laser scan of her eyes to measure the amount and quality of the oil, as well as her natural pattern of blinking. >> that represents the blinks. >> after analyzing the dat
the public, your organisms. idea is to peak inside your body and surprise you with the results. carolyn johnson, health and sighen reporter, has the details. >> for jessica, microbes are a window into the human body. >> everything in your gut, you are eating what you eat. >> she's talking about the thousands of biological hitchhikers that live in our stomachs and in our bodies. a community known as our microbiome. earlier this year researchers at the glad stone institute at ucf did a detailed map that helped and catalog all the bacteria present in the human digestive system. they believe knowing which organisms are there and what they are doing can tell us a lot about what is going on inside our bodies. >> there's a wide range of diseases, everything from obesity to diabetes. >> to take advantage of that information, richmond and her team are launching a start-up called u-bium. kind of a gut level variation on gene sequencing. it's headquartered at an incubator lab at ucf. doug crawford believes the project could pay multiple dividends. >> they are turning science into impact with alrea
carolyn johnson with the details. >> on a bad day, even driving can be a challenge for helen cole. >> the hardest part about driving is seeing the signs clearly and it adds a distinctive glare of bluriness. >> while her normal vision is fine, the blurriness comes from a condition called dry eye. she's forced to treat it throughout the day. >> from the time you get up in the morning your eyes already feel gritty, sometimes they are swollen. definitely red and they have a burning sensation. >> you have a relatively low oil here. >> the ophtamologist said the condition is often caused by a lack of oil which allows the eye's natural oil to evaporate. he is going to treat it with a new technology called lipiflow. it's from pure science. >> that's perfect. >> first they perform a laser scan of her eyes to measure the amount and quality of the oil, as well as her natural pattern of blinking. >> that represents the blinks. >> after analyzing the data, the doctor places two small cups directly on to helen's eyes. they are designed to reach the oil glands beneath her eyelids. >> it warms th
for joining us for abc 7 news at 4:00. i'm carolyn johnson. >> i'm larry beil. the news at 5:00 begins right flu. >> thank you. new details emerge in the bay bridge tanker accident. was the bar pilot's fault? >> also here, caught in the act. an east bay burglary ring busted by an alert homeowner. >> i'm abc 7 news sandhya patel. live from the roof of the kgotv broadcast center, we're basking in the sun and will be freezing in the winter chill. details coming up. >> good evening, i'm dan ashley. >> i'm cheryl jennings. new details about the repair to the bay bridge after yesterday's tanker crash. >> that is right. abc 7 news i team uncovered three incidents involving the bar pilot guy clees. he grounded a boat carrier on a sandbag two. days later hit a cat walk in stockton. in may, 2010 grounded a tug boat. he was not formally punished. >> it remains unclear if he will be blamed for yesterday's crash when a tanker hit the bridge that, section of the bay was fogged in. >> now, the collision did not breech it's double hull there is no damage to the bay bridge, either thanks to a fenlder around
comfortable. abc7 news health and science reporter carolyn johnson has the details. >> ellen sue is all smiles when she plays with her newborn son. a smile that's actually improving thanks to evolving technology. >> today we will scan your feet. >> she's beenfied for the popular invisaline braces. >> it's a departure from the traditional molds used by most orthodontists. >> now we can have models without taking the goopy impressions. >> first he reaches for the scanner that will photograph ellen's teeth. it's connected to a computer system that will ultimately beam the images from her practice in san francisco to the itera lab. over the next several minutes the doctor guides the camera around ellen's upper and lower jaw line. the device is completely optical. no radiation. >> we can get these areas here. >> step by step the camera builds a three-dimensional map of her teeth. the computer alerts the dentist if the section doesn't have a complete image so it can be rephotographed. >> it's very precise and very accurate. >> she said the process is typically quicker than traditional impressionings
a lot more comfortable. health and science reporter carolyn johnson has the details. >> helen sue is all smiles when she plays with her newborn son. she has benefited for the popular invisoline braces. it's to adjust them is departure from traditional molds used by other doctors. >> it's called the health scanner. we can have study models without taking the immaterial presentations. >> first they reach for the scanner that will photograph her teeth. it's connected to a computer system that will beam the images from her practice in san francisco to the itero lab. over the next several minutes the doctor guides the camera around ellen's up and lower jaw line. it's optical. >> these little areas right there. >> step by step they build a map of her teeth. computer alerts the dentist they don't have a complete image so it can be rephotographed. >> it's very accurate. >> it's quicker than traditional impressions. >> you have to leave the material that does not taste good from three to five minutes. if it wasn't a good impression they would have to take another one. >> cost can vary by practice
health and science reporter carolyn johnson has the details. >> when most people see a stack of legos you see this and this guy sees building blocks of science. his campus used piles of them to construction their very own working lego microscope. >> the microscope essentially is made out of two lenses the. the first one is here. >> they did need to fabricate a few specialty parts in the lab's 3d printer. a kind of computer easy bake oven that converts schools of snap on objects like lens holders. the results, a working device built to answer all kinds of scientific questions except the one you may be asking yourself right now, why build a microscope out of legos at all? the answer is a new program just launched at ucsf. it's a course designed to change the way scientists think about their work. one of the goals is to make research projects more practice by focusing on the end user. >> and having them work together in this ideal-based way. brainstorming ideas. it brings a new dimension to the way that science can be done. >> as a test case, the team was tasked with reimagining uses for cel
. abc7 news health and science reporter carolyn johnson has the details. >> when most people see a stack of legos, you see this, and this guy sees building blocks of science. his campus used piles of them to construct their very own working lego microscope. >> the microscope essentially is made out of two lenses. the first one is here. >> they did need to fabricate a few specialty parts in the lab's 3d printer. a kind of computer easy bake oven that converts schools of snap-on objects like lens holders. the results, a working device built to answer all kinds of scientific questions except the one you may be asking yourself right now, why build a microscope out of legos at all? the answer is a new program just launched at ucsf. it's a course designed to change the way scientists think about their work. the director says one of the goals is to make research projects more practice by focusing on the end user. >> and having them work together in this idea-based way. brainstorming ideas. it brings a new dimension to the way that science can be done. >> as a test case, the team was tasked with
the $20 it is charging for a yearly subscription. from bloomberg studios, i'm cory johnson, larry, carolyn, back to you. >> cory, thank you. >> two teenagers escaped with a mild case of hypothermia after clinging for life to a dead tree. this is in arizona. the lakeside fire department provided these images of the kids climbing up the tree in sholo, arizona got into trouble after the ice broke on the lake. a friend stayed on the shore that have lake called for help. about 25 people teamed up to rescue them, frightening moment autos yes. it's still cold out there. more frost again this, morning. >> two mornings in a row, temperatures dropping into 20s. that is chilly out there now. here is a live view from our east bay hills camera. looking at the western sky, sun will be setting soon. about oh... 40 minutes or so. but now we've got bright, sunny skies, taking a look at temperature readings into the 50s foremost of the bay area now. 56 in fremont and chilly to cold overnight, milder tomorrow but a couple degrees. rain likely saturday and sunday. weekend shaping up to be at least partly wet.
up next. >> and tonight on jimmy kimmel live, magic johnson. jimmy kimmel live airs week nights right here in its new time following carolyn and me with abc 7 news at 11:00.ñcús]ñ >>> coming up a better than expected earnings report from facebook. and mayor ed lee's safety campaign but sit helping to reassure concerned business ownersúáríwr? >>> a map can give us insight into the super bowl. >> 35 million facebook users this map looks like niners fans dominate the nation. >> ravens fans mostly on the >> i like those results. very good. >> that is is going to do it for us. >>> this is "world news." tonight, a wall of wind roaring across the country, spawning a big tornado. wracking a town. winds so rough, they knock over a freight train and topple a helicopter as it tries to land. >>> showdown. congresswoman gabby giffords makes a surprise appearance to push congress on guns and violence. >> the time is now. you must act. >> her opposition? the head of the nra. so, who won the first round? >>> the $275 million man on the ropes tonight? the guy who got all the glamour and the girl
. in the kitchen. [ female announcer ] sc johnson, a family company. >>> in the early month of carolyn savage's pregnancy, she and her husband, shawn, decided they would not reveal who they were. or have any contact with the couple whose embryo she received. but that didn't stop carolyn from worrying about them. especially the mother-to-be. >> i just thought, these people are going to be scared enough and then i'm thinking, but maybe they're better off not knowing who we are at this point and knowing my medical history. because that's only going to add fuel to their fear. >> now three months into the pregnancy, they were about to meet. >> those embryos, we thought about them all the time. >> the merrills are a family with young twins living in suburban detroit. two hours away from the savages. paul is an electrical engineer, shannon, a history teacher. they married in 2002 and had tried for several years to have children with no success. finally their doctor recommended invitro fertilization. the results were even better than they had hoped. >> and we're like, wow. it worked. and then we went
Search Results 60 to 76 of about 77 (some duplicates have been removed)

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